Mount Rogers Backpacking Trip
Nov. 8-9, 2003





WHEN:  Saturday and Sunday  November 8-9, 2003
 
WHERE:  Meet at Dollar General and Little Kitchen Parking Lot @ 7:00 am- leave at 7:30 am sharp.

WHAT TO BRING:  Permission Slip, Trail Lunch and all food packed and repackaged for hiking for Saturday night and Sunday Breakfast as well as early lunch on Sunday, Backpacking Stove (Dave has Extras), A mess kit type Pot (one or two Quart) you can share with another person if you like, Bowl, Fork and Spoon, Water bottles -full, cigarette lighter, sleeping bag, foam pad, ground cloth or personal tarp, Tent if you have one and want to carry it, pillow- small, change of clothes, layered clothing such as fleece and other warm layers.  We will be camping at around 3000-4000 feet of elevation and it will be much cooler than at home, hiking shoes or Boots, headlamp or flashlight, extra batteries, garbage bag for covering your pack, money for a meal on the return and for fuel for drivers.  Definitely bring an enterprising spirit, indefatigable curiosity, and unbridled enthusiasm about a great time in the Outdoors with your Venture Crew Friends. Just think we will have a chance to stand on the Highest point of the State of Virginia and you can start your collection of State High pointers as well as to work on the Ranger Award core Requirement "Leave No Trace" and the Ranger Elective for Backpacking.  See Additional Sheets.   

RETURN TIME: Leaving the Mount Rogers area at approximately Noon or a little later, we will find a place for a later lunch stop; one would expect a return time of between 4-5pm. 

COST:  By providing our own meals and paying for the drivers fuel we should be able to do this for much less than by renting a vehicle.  I believe that $20 should be more than adequate.  Fuel should be around $8-10   We might want to get some breakfast on the way out and we can stop for a late lunch like snack on the way back.  $20 should be about right.

Web Sites of Interest:







Gear Checklist


Permission Slip
Trail Lunch
Personal Food
Backpacking Stove (Dave has Extras)
A mess kit type Pot (one or two Quart) you can share with another
Bowl
Fork and Spoon
Water bottles full
Cigarette lighter for each stove or pot
Sleeping bag
Foam pad
Ground cloth or personal tarp
Tent if you have one and want to carry it
Pillow- small
Change of clothes
Layered clothing such as fleece and other warm layers
We will be camping at around 3000-4000 feet of elevation and it will be much cooler than at home.
Hiking shoes or Boots
Headlamp or flashlight
Extra batteries
Garbage bag for covering your pack
Money for a meal on the return and for fuel for drivers.
Optional:  Camera  digital or disposable and Treking Poles



Food Checklist

Trail Lunch for Saturday
Dinner  Possibly a Lipton pasta pack
Hot Jell-O or Hot Chocolate
Breakfast - possibly instant oatmeal, grits,
Trail Mix
Ziploc bags to repack
Fruit
Breakfast or Snack Bars






Mount Rogers Backpacking Trip
Nov. 8-9, 2003
PERMISSION SLIP

Parents,
We need your permission to take your son/daughter Backpacking and Camping in the High Country of Virginia.  We will take all precautions, and care for them as our own.  Your signature is your permission for your son/daughter to attend as well as permission to treat if your son/daughter is injured.

   If you are interested in going with us (and you are invited) Please let me know as soon as possible.  School (704) 664-5545 * Home (704) 855-2511 We need adult chaperones of both sexes and Drivers and Transportation.  I feel that you would have a really great time.  Do something different!  Try something new!  Something you have never done before!  Lets Go Backpacking and see the wild horses!!!
  Thanks!!!
                                                                              
     Dave Barlow -Derek Miller 
    Venture Crew Advisors

Participant_______________________________________________

Parent / Guardian ________________________________________

Date:  __________________________



WHEN:  Saturday and Sunday  November 8-9, 2003
 
WHERE:  Meet at Dollar General and Little Kitchen Parking Lot @ 7:00 am- leave at 7:30am sharp.

RETURN TIME: Leaving the Mount Rogers area at approximately Noon or a little later, we will find a place for a later lunch stop; one would expect a return time of between 4-5pm. 

COST:   $20 should be about right.



Ranger Requirements for Leave No Trace and Backpacking

Principles of Leave No Trace
·          Plan Ahead and Prepare
·          Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces
·          Dispose of Waste Properly
·          Leave What You Find
·          Minimize Campfire Impacts
·          Respect Wildlife
·          Be Considerate of Other Visitors



1.          Leave No Trace
a.          Recite and explain the principles of Leave No Trace.
b.          Participate in three separate camping/backpacking trips demonstrating that you                know and use Leave No Trace principles.
c.          Make a tabletop display or presentation on the Leave No Trace principles and how          they affect the environment and attitude of campers for your crew, another crew,           a Cub or Boy Scout group, or another group.



Backpacking
1.          Develop a personal exercise plan and follow it for at least three months, exercising           at least three times a week. Set your goals with backpacking in mind and write                them down. Keep a daily diary.
2.          
a.       Try on three types of backpacks. Learn how to choose the proper size frame for             your body size. Learn and then be able to explain to others the difference                       between a soft pack, an internal frame pack, and an external frame. Tell the pros            and cons of each type and what kind of trek you would take with each pack.
b.           Explain the different parts of a backpack and their use.
c.          Learn the proper way to lift and wear your backpack.
d.          Describe at least four ways to limit weight and bulk in your backpack without                 jeopardizing your health and safety.
e.          Learn how you would load an internal frame pack versus one with an external                frame.

3.          
a.          Pack your backpack with your personal gear, including outdoor essentials,                      additional gear, and personal extras. Pack as though You were sharing equipment            with one other person for a three-day, two-night backpacking trip.
b.          List at least 10 items essential for an overnight backpacking trek and explain why            each item is necessary.
c.          Present yourself to an experienced backpacker, unload your pack, have him or her          critique your packing, then repack your pack. Have him or her critique your                   efforts.

4.          
a.          List at least 20 items of group backpacking gear. Include a group cleanup kit.
b.          Learn how and then demonstrate how to cook a meal using a backpacking stove.
c.          Demonstrate proper sanitation of backpacking cook gear,.
d.          Learn how to properly pack and carry a backpacking stove and fuel.
5.          
a.          List at least 10 environmental considerations that are important for backpacking               and describe ways to lessen their impact on the environment.
b.          Considering Leave No Trace principles, tell how to dispose of the human waste,             liquid waste, and garbage you generate on a backpacking trip.
6.          
a.          Participate in three different treks of at least three days and two nights each,                   covering at least 15 miles in distance each.
b.          Plan and lead a backpacking trek (can be one of the treks in (a) above) with at                least five people for at least two days. This group can be your crew, another crew,          a Boy Scout group, or another youth group.
c.          Plan the menu for this trek using commercially prepared backpacking foods for at            least one meal.
d.          Check for any permits needed and prepare a trip plan to be left with your family.            Have an emergency contact number.
e.          Using the map you used to chart your course, brief the crew you are leading on               your trip plan.
f.           Lead a shakedown for those you are leading.

7.          
a.          Learn about proper backpacking clothing for backpacking in all four seasons.
b.          Learn about proper footwear, socks, and foot care.
c.          Learn and then demonstrate at least three uses for a poncho in backpacking.

8.          
a.          Learn about trail health considerations and typical backpacking injuries such as                hypothermia, frostbite, heat exhaustion, heat stroke, altitude sickness, dehydration,          blisters, stings and bites, and sprains and how to avoid and treat these injuries and           illnesses.
b.          Because fluid intake is so important to a backpacker, tell how to take care of your           water supply on a backpacking trip. include ways of purifying water and why that           is important.
c.          Prepare a first aid kit and survival kit for your backpack.
9.          Using all the knowledge you have acquired about backpacking, make a display or            presentation for your crew, another crew, a Boy Scout group, or another                        youth group. Include equipment and clothing selection and use, trip planning,                  environmental considerations, trail health and safety considerations, food selection           and preparation, and backpacking physical preparation.